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Introduction of Faculty members

Faculty members of ChubuSat Instrument Development Project have been ready to advise students working on this project and they have each specialty in various fields regarding space. Please refer this section for consultations in need.
photo:Hidehiro Kaneda

Hidehiro Kaneda, Professor, Head of ChubuSat instrument developing project office

Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University

Research Field: Infrared astronomy using AKARI and other satellite data. Hardware development for infrared astronomical observations in space.

photo:Program coordinator Hiroyasu Tajima

Hiroyasu Tajima, Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

Instrument development: Software development and execution of acceptance tests for silicon detector subsystem of the NASA Fermi gamma-ray satellite. Optimization of silicon detectors, development of application specific integrated circuits, design optimization of a Compton camera through simulation work.
Science interests:Gamma-ray bursts, cosmic-rays acceleration in supernova remnants, and dark matter search.

photo:Katuhiko Yamada

Katsuhiko Yamada, Professor

Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Visiting Professor, Nagoya University)

Spacecraft control system development:: Analysis and design of a spacecraft attitude and orbit control system including a randezvous-docking system, a formation-flying system, and an antenna-pointing.

photo: Masafumi Hirahara

Masafumi Hirahara, Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

Subject of Research, Study Technique: In-situ observation and experimental study of subject of the ionospheres and magnetospheres, and upper atmospheres around the earth and planets using space explorers such as spacecraft or rocket and plasma experimental devices.

photo:Masaaki Katayama

Masaaki Katayama, Professor

Vice-director, EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University,

Communications for Space Systems (C4S): : The advanced communication technologies for space systems with technical challenges including large Doppler shift of non-stationary satellites, limited power supply and the frequency band.
Space Systems for Communications (S4C): : Realization of communication systems with satellites robust to disaster, satellite positioning systems, etc.

photo:Hironori Matsumoto

Hironori Matsumoto, Associate Professor

Center for Experimental Studies, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI)

X-rays observation Instrument Development:X-rays CCD onboard "Suzaku" satellite, hard X ray telescopes onboard ASTRO-H satellite and Next-generation X-ray optics elements.
Scientific Research: High energy astrophysics, cosmic rays acceleration, plasma of the Galaxy and cluster of galaxies and ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs).

Photo:Hosei Nagano

Housei Nagano, Associate Professor

Aerospace Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University

Research Field: The space instrument thermal management, thermal energy transportation, thermophysical properties measurement and loop heat pipe

Photo:Narusawa

Yasutaka NARUSAWA, Visiting Associate Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

atellite-related system development:Design, fabrication and experiment of the main body of ChubuSat-1 satellite, and calibration and analysis of onboard observation instruments, thermal design of JAXA'S microsatellite "Reimei", overall satellite system design on NICT micro SmartSat-1, integrated system test planning on HTV

photo:Tanaka

Hidetaka Tanaka, Project Professor

Aerospace Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University

Development of manned space system:Engaged in development of International Space Station installation type Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO" that is first Japanese manned space system until its launching from the beginning. Conducted international technical coordination at NASA, JSC and KSC, program management, systems engineering, man systems integration (space), environmental control and life system

Photo:Ishihara

Daisuke Ishihara, Project Lecturer

Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University

Development and operation of onboard instruments:: Development of the infrared camera onboard "Akari" infrared astronomical satellite. Operation and data analysis of "Akari" all-sky survey observation.
Research Field: Study of the organic matters in universe. Evolution of the solid materials in the formation process of the planet, and its generation process in the old stars and supernova remnants.

Photo: Tamura

Keisuke Tamura, Project Lecturer

Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University

Development of Instruments for X-ray Astronomy: : Development of the X-ray telescope. A design and production of the X-ray optics which used multilayers for as optical elements. Development of the thin film deposition method (sputtering method, EB method) for technological advances of the multilayer. In addition, establishment of the measurement systems to evaluate the performance of the X-ray reflecting mirror using X-ray beam line and synchrotron radiation facilities.
Development of tracking system for scientific balloons: Development of high function command and high speed telemetry system for the scientific balloons and development of new model of balloons and etc.
Research Field: Study of X-ray sources, particularly, X-ray pulsars and supernova remnants, and galactic evolution through those studies.





Photo:Shiokawa

Kazuo Shiokawa, Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

Study of plasma phenomena in the ionosphere and magnetosphere using both satellite and ground-based measurement

Photo:Kusano

Kanya Kusano, Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

Solar physics, space weather, plasma astrophysics, fusion plasma, could physics, nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, and computational physics.

Photo:Masuda

Satoshi Masuda, Associate Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

Particle acceleration in solar flares using RHESSI and "Hinode" satellite.

Photo:Seki

Kanako Seki, Associate Professor

Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo

Study of space plasma phenomena as well as dynamics of terrestrial and planetary magnetospheres based on in-situ plasma observations and numerical simulations. The related satellite missions include Geotail, Nozomi, FAST, Reimei, Hisaki, Kaguya, ERG, MMS, MAVEN, and BepiColombo.

Photo:Miyoshi

Yoshizumi Miyoshi, Associate Professor

Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University

Study of the space plasma physics, including transportation, acceleration, and disspation processes of the energetic particle with the integrated analysis that combined numerical simulation with the satellite data.

Photo:Watanabe

Seiichiro Watanabe, Professor

Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University

Reconstruction of planetary formation process using computer simulations and asteroid exploration data

Photo:Yamaguchi

Yasushi Yamaguchi, Professor

Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University

Study of the earth environment and surface processes by satellite remote sensing

Photo:Ishizaka

Jyoji Ishizaka, Professor

Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University

Study of marine environment by satellite remote sensing, specifically study of variability of ocean primary production using ocean color remote sensing

Photo:Masunaga

Hirohiko Masunaga, Associate Professor

Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University

Study of cloud and precipitation climatology using satellite data

Photo:Sash

Akihiro Sasoh, Professor

Aerospace Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University

Space propulsion engineering, compressible fluid dynamics, high enthalpy flow, shock waves, plasma, laser supersonic flow, electric propulsion

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